Should companies allow co worker dating

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Global management and strategy consultant Kathleen Brush says when a company she’s working with doesn’t have a policy expressly forbidding superior-subordinate relationships, she lobbies hard to get one in place.

“I do this because [relationships] can cause a lot of damage. They are dead ringers for cascading violations of integrity.” One of the major concerns regarding junior/senior dating is that there may be an element of coercion.

Focus on work and do your job — especially if you want to mitigate gossip.

"No one wants to hear about how deeply you're in love with each other or where you went last weekend or the fight you had in the car this morning," she explains. Again — nobody wants or needs to know about what's happening with your love life.

A stunning 20% of people who told Career Builder that they had dated someone at the office admitted that at least one person in the relationship was married.

Perhaps that makes sense given the amount of time we spend at work: In an office relationship, you can relate to the struggles someone faces from 9 to 5, says Brownlee.

This policy should reserve the employer’s right to make employment decisions, including transferring or changing lines of communication, Zoller says.

Many experts say it’s important for companies to have policies in place that address junior-senior relationships.

But here’s the thing: Whether or not there are policies forbidding them, office relationships happen.

A recent survey by Career Builder found that nearly 40% of employees admitted to having a romantic relationship with a co-worker.

While many organizations take a more relaxed stance toward co-workers dating these days, it can cause trouble when you cross into the realm of manager-subordinate romantic relationships.

“Junior-senior relationships in the office can hurt morale and even harm the company if the people involved forget their professionalism,” says Beth P. The relationship can lead to claims of favoritism or cause other co-workers to feel uncomfortable and create a hostile work environment.

Often, an employee will argue that he or she was an unwilling participant in a relationship that merely appeared to be consensual.

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