Aggression and violence in dating relationships

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Due to the severity of negative health outcomes, it is imperative for counselors to understand the experiences of adolescents to facilitate early intervention with this at risk population (Hays et al., 2007).

Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.This study clarifies and adds to our understanding of how gender and gender orientation affect physical aggression in dating relationships.The stereotype of male violence assumes that men exclusively or nearly exclusively use abusive and violent behavior to manage conflict situations with an intimate partner, and that the more violent men will be more masculine.We explored adolescent females’ definitions of healthy and abusive relationships, experiences with unhealthy relationships, and responses to dating violence in order to develop effective strategies to intervene with this population.Implications for school counseling and mental health counseling practice, training, interventions and future research are discussed.A more masculine and/or less feminine gender orientation and variations in relationship seriousness proved to be the two strongest predictors of both men's and women's involvement in courtship violence.

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