A commonsense guide to successful internet dating

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Writing in 1884, James Russell Lowell wondered a bit nervously about the long-term consequences of the “trooping of emotion” that the electric telegraph, with its fragmented messages, encouraged.Lowell and others feared that the sophisticated new media we were devising might alter not just how we communicate, but how we feel.

Morse sent his first long-distance telegraph message in 1844, he chose words that emphasized both the awe and apprehension he felt about his new device. ” read the paper tape message of dots and dashes sent from the U. Capitol building to Morse’s associates in Baltimore.But Katz knows better than to push instant gratification upon the overly willing.Katz knows because, even though he now has a growing business and a shiny new book on the shelves, much of his life has been a study in delayed or (downright cancelled) fulfillment.Jeff Whitfield shouldn’t need any help meeting women.When he talks in his calm, Kentucky drawl about his past rambunctiousness and the salvation his faith provided him, he sounds charming, self-possessed, and likable — not the kind of guy who would need an online dating service. Jeff’s initial impression of the people who use internet dating sites was characteristically blunt. The problem is, the people he kept meeting weren’t exactly winners.It’s an unlikely career for a man – much less a man who was called a “serial dater” by CNN - yet that’s what makes Katz such a unique coach.

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